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Parenting support: exploring the current landscape in Glasgow

Date: November 2016
Category: Report
Work programme: Early years
Author: Fiona Crawford, Rona Dougall, Valerie McNeice, Rachel Harris

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This report presents findings and recommendations from qualitative research conducted in 2015/16 that explored key informants' views on the delivery and impact of parenting support programmes in Glasgow.

 It was undertaken by a multi-agency evaluation group, led by Greater Glasgow and Clyde Public Health Directorate, to gain a clearer picture of the range and scope of parenting support services currently being utilised by the statutory/third sector in Glasgow Health and Social Care Partnership , and how these fit within wider family support structures. The findings are intended to inform future prioritisation, planning and delivery of parenting/family support across Glasgow Health and Social Care Partnership as well as other partnership areas in Scotland.

Five main themes emerged from the data and the findings are presented under these:

1.  Economic, social and cultural context

2.  Range and fidelity of parenting support programmes

3.  Relationships and engagement

4.  Monitoring and evaluation

5.  Clarity of vision, leadership and future direction.

The report concludes that parenting support is now firmly embedded in Glasgow as an important component of early intervention across the statutory and third sector and that there is growing recognition of the importance of family support which can take account of and respond to a family’s economic, social and cultural context. Five key recommendations are made for services and agencies involved in commissioning or delivering parenting interventions in Glasgow: 

  • Establish a more integrated family/parenting support model underpinned by the ‘Getting it Right for Every Child’ principles that can take account of and respond to a family’s economic, social and cultural context.
  • Recognise that no one programme fits all families and therefore broaden parenting programme options to widen the focus from Triple P to other programmes and interventions.
  • Build on existing good examples of cross-organisational working as seen in partnerships between the NHS, education and the third sector.
  • Provide greater clarity about what constitutes success and share monitoring and evaluation strategies that include a focus on outcomes for families.
  • Build relationships with families to help them take an active part in support plans rather than being viewed as passive recipients of programmes or services.

Access the report on the second phase of this research.